《每日电讯报》记者网志报道艺术家吴玉仁被绑架殴打案

看看五毛狗网狗行动多么积极敏锐。这篇网志报道下面立刻就有五毛狗在散布谎言:

pacificcentury
Yesterday 03:56 PM
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4 people
Liu Xiaobo was jailed because he had received USD 136,000 from the NED (The National Endowment for Democracy, a US foundation with links to the CIA, which also provides funds to Dalai Lama and Rebiya to conduct separatist activities in China) before drafting the Chapter 08. So Liu’s intention (to fight for democracy) was highly suspicious in Beijing’s eyes.

If Wu Yuren had kept away from Liu Xiaobo in the first place, his other “provocations” against the authorities might still be tolerated, and he might not have ended up in this miserable situation.

刘晓波被判刑是因为他在起草《零八宪章》之前从国家民主基金会 NED 接受了 13万6千美元。民主基金会是一个和中央情报局 CIA 有关的美国机构,同时也为达赖喇嘛和热比亚提供资金在中国进行分离主义活动。所以刘为民主斗争的动机在北京的眼里高度可疑。

如果吴玉仁一开始就和刘晓波保持距离,那么他的其他一些“挑衅”政权的事情也许会被容忍,他也就不会落入这种可悲的境地。

不杀狗行吗?

aiww @wentommy: 《每日电讯报》见仁勇为驻华记者 Peter Foster 感谢!http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/peterfoster/100045803/portrait-of-a-chinese-artist-in-detention/


http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/peterfoster/100045803/portrait-of-a-chinese-artist-in-detention/
BLOGS HOME » NEWS » WORLD » PETER FOSTER
Peter Foster
Peter Foster moved to Beijing in March 2009. He was formerly the Daily Telegraph’s South Asia Correspondent based New Delhi from 2004-2008. He is married with three children.

Portrait of a Chinese artist in detention
 
By Peter Foster World Last updated: July 2nd, 2010
11 Comments Comment on this article

Wu-with-daughter

Wu Yuren with his five-year-old daughter

I have today received a first-hand account of the workings of China’s justice system which I shall try to outline in as dispassionate way as possible because it gives an impression of how the process works in China. The case concerns an artist-activist called Wu Yuren who was in the newspapers last February as a leading member a group of Beijing artists who won compensation after being forcibly evicted from the city’s 008 art district – a lesser known version of the famed 798 art quarter.

Wu was detained by police over a month ago after a dispute with the management of 798 over an electricity generator which led to him spraying graffiti with black spray paint over several walls of the art district.

On May 31st Wu went to the local police station to put his side of the story but, according to his wife, a Canadian citizen called Karen Patterson, was detained by police and – possibly after a scuffle, or possibly as a result of a beating – was left injured.

Ms Patterson says she now thinks her husband could soon be charged with the serious offence of striking a police officer, but – and here’s the point – she cannot be sure because she’s had no access to her husband. The charge – “obstructing and attacking a police officer” – carries a maximum penalty of three years in jail. After seeking advice from the Canadian Embassy’s consular section she’s been told that under Chinese law the police are entitled to hold Wu for 37 days without granting any access to the outside world.

She’s been allowed to drop off some clothes and money for him at the Chaoyang Detention Centre in Beijing but, aside from a 10-minute legal visit a week ago, all attempts to elicit further information have been rebuffed.

For now she must wait at home with her five-year-old daughter who knows only that Daddy has “gone away” for “doing something bad” and isn’t able to answer his mobile phone. Ms Patterson has tried to obtain a copy of her husband’s detention report, but since she doesn’t share a “hukou” – residence permit – with her husband (who’s registered to Changzhou in Jiangsu Province) she’s not allowed to see it.

Our own inquiries into Wu’s situation, and the circumstances and type of his detention, were similarly rebuffed by (a very polite) official who said that information can only be released to the family. The only other information comes from Wu’s friend, a CD store owner called Yang Licai, who was detained at the same time as Wu but released after ten days.

In a telephone interview we conducted today, he said that the pair went to Beijing’s Jiuxianqiao police station at 3pm on May 31st to report the seizure of the generator but were put in a cell and told “to do what we order you to do”.

He said:

After being jailed in the cages for nearly five hours, 7 or 8 policemen went to the room to seize Wu and delivered him to another room against his will. And then I twice heard Wu’s screams, which sounded very painful.

The policemen did not take down our notes o
n the case until 8pm. At night I saw Wu standing in corridor when I went to toilet, I noticed one of his arms was hanging down, immobile. He told me that his arm was hit by a policemen and he could not move it.

Like all detainees, he was asked to sign a statement stating his name, age, address and expected length of detention which, in Yang’s case, was 10 days.

Worryingly, however, Yang says that Wu’s statement contained no expected date of release – a piece of information has obviously further dismayed his wife – so he advised him not to sign it. Yang says that he went on a four-day hunger strike in protest at Wu’s treatment but gave up on June 4th after being taken to be put on a nutrient drip by the authorities.

I pass no comment on the “facts” of the case, beyond reporting what I have been able to find out from two, admittedly partial, sources. I’ll happily report the police version in full if they will supply it. The problem is that the lack of transparency inevitably leads to suspicions, warranted or otherwise.

Wu Yuren has been something of a thorn in the side of the authorities in recent months, winning his compensation battle in 008 (during which he was held by police), sending out copious “tweets” and signing the Charter 08 pro-democracy petition that landed Liu Xiaobo 11 years in jail last December. When I met Wu for lunch a couple of months ago, he was clearly nervous, pointing out several clean-cut young men sitting at a nearby table who he suspected were members of the public security apparatus and had been following him.

Did Wu Yuren hit a police officer? Are there any witnesses? If he did, who threw the first punch? Has he been well-treated inside China’s detention system which labored under many recent allegations of brutality? If he’s charged, will he get a fair hearing?

For now it seems we can only watch and wait – and watch we will.

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Showing 11 comments

22Igonikon2
Yesterday 11:30 PM
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1 person
Peter Foster’s article impressively offers a bitter
taste of Chinese law and criminal-justice system.
Here, like in most totalitarian, tyrannical states,
an accused is presumed guilty until he or she
proves his or her innocence. The fact is that there
are, perhaps, thousands of dissidents and human-
rights actiivists (branded counter-revolutionaries)
in Wu Yuren’s situation. Igonikon Jack, USA
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j_striker
Today 07:25 AM
Take some English lessons you tard.
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22Igonikon2
Today 08:20 AM
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To: Jstriker
You don’t know what you are talking shout. It’s
rather, the other way round: Learn some good
English and new vocabulary. I taught English in
high school. I”m a freelancer. My articles and
bylines have been published in other publications
besides DT, often, with little editing required; and
more. Who are you? Igonikon Jack, USA
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JohanDeMeulemeester
Yesterday 06:51 PM
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Lets hope that the Chinese prison authorities are more humane than the American prison authorities in charge of the prison gulags in Guantanamo and Abu Ghraib where the Americans drag their prisoners like dogs on leashes and beat them senseless.
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victork
Yesterday 06:13 PM
Is it really news that justice and the rule of law are strangers to the oligarchs who rule China?

This story is worth reporting to keep us informed about what kind of a country China really is. But there shouldn’t be any expectation, or hope, that Western governments will make representations on Wu Yuren’s behalf. This is an internal matter of a sovereign state (a consideration, btw, that doesn’t apply to occupied Tibet) and doesn’t merit external political interference.
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pacificcentury
Yesterday 03:56 PM
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4 people
Liu Xiaobo was jailed because he had received USD 136,000 from the NED (The National Endowment for Democracy, a US foundation with links to the CIA, which also provides funds to Dalai Lama and Rebiya to conduct separatist activities in China) before drafting the Chapter 08. So Liu’s intention (to fight for democracy) was highly suspicious in Beijing’s eyes.

If Wu Yuren had kept away from Liu Xiaobo in the first place, his other “provocations” against the authorities might still be tolerated, and he might not have ended up in this miserable situation.
(Edited by author 16 hours ago)
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j_striker
Yesterday 04:13 PM
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Interesting. You do realise of course that china carries out “plausible deniability” operations through quasi-governmental organisations also though, right?

And for the record the US is in the unique position of being a Pacific and Atlantic power so we could argue that the 20th was a Pacific century too.

;-p
(Edited by author 1 day ago)
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pacificcentury
Today 01:13 AM
No doubt China was/is/will always be involved in some kind of “dirty tricks” via its quasi-governmental organizations to meddle with foreign affairs, just like any other countries which have the ability and vested interests to do so.

I never doubt the US’s ability to dominate the world and I think she will still be the only “real superpower” in the 21st century. Yes China is rising quick but she is also facing far too many problems (e.g., population, environment and resources). To make things worse, other traditional big powers (mainly the West, and Japan to a certain extent) have been aware of China’s rise and have determined to undermine China via different “tricks” (either openly or covertly). So China does have a very rough road ahead.
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JohanDeMeulemeester
Yesterday 02:39 PM
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Total non story……….why dont you do a piece on the massive Chinese “live fire” naval maneuvers in the east china sea to keep the massive US aircraft carrier George Washington from entering the Yellow Se
a within striking distance of Beijing (your home).
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j_striker
Yesterday 03:16 PM
What’s your point? That’s not a story either.
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j_striker
Yesterday 02:09 PM
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Who cares?

The guy waltzed around his local neighbourhood vandalising it ‘cos he didn’t get his way in a dispute with someoneorother (local council, electricity company, whoever), literally like a 5 yr old.

I mean what kind of grown man with a family to look after acts in such a petulant childish way?

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